Amerindian Gods

In 1798 in Ohio, a Methodist minister named James B. Finley met with members of the Wyandot nation and asked them about their God and his. The Wyandots were descendants of Wendat refugees who, more than a century before, had fled from a land that kept changing names, and had just seven years earlier been … Continue reading Amerindian Gods

Werewolves of Quebec

On Halloween, Canadiana, “a web series on the hunt for the most incredible stories in Canadian history,” posted a story about a French Canadian The Werewolf: In the 1760s, strange reports began to appear in a French-Canadian newspaper. There was, according to the Gazette de Québec, a vicious beast preying on the population of the colony: a … Continue reading Werewolves of Quebec

A brief history of eugenics and sexual sterilization in Canada

In 1921 the American Museum of Natural History, of which I am a member, hosted an International Eugenics Congress in Manhattan. Alexander Graham Bell, a Scottish-born American sometimes claimed by Canada, “served as honorary president.” The conference aimed to foster a “climate of international cooperation for eugenics goals.” There was indeed growing enthusiasm for eugenics on both … Continue reading A brief history of eugenics and sexual sterilization in Canada

Non-revolutionary Canada in the Revolutionary Era

From 1776 to 1825, wars of independence swept through the Americas. Canada, for the most part, was an exception. Why? The Americas in the Revolutionary Era, a Great Courses lecture by Marshall C. Eakin, surveys the countries of the Americas and how they gained their independence. It focuses on the period he calls the “revolutionary … Continue reading Non-revolutionary Canada in the Revolutionary Era