Agona

This is a continuation of the previous post, Donnacona. If you haven’t read that yet, I suggest you start there. Agona As Cartier sailed away from Stadacona with his ten captives, he left behind 25 dead crew members in the land he’d come to call Canada. Five years later, as he sailed away from France to … Continue reading Agona

Donnacona

I. There was a man named Donnacona, the leader of the Stadaconan nation. Every summer he led a large delegation of men, women, and children on a fishing or hunting trip to build up their food supplies for the long winters of their country. This year (a year we call 1534, but that the Stadaconans … Continue reading Donnacona

Les sauvages

This is my second-last post of my year of blogging weekly about Canadian history, and I didn’t plan well enough ahead to have a post related to Christmas. Instead, here is an interesting observation from Champlain’s Dream by David Hackett Fischer. Samuel de Champlain somewhat famously referred to the Indigenous peoples of the land now called … Continue reading Les sauvages

Amerindian Gods

In 1798 in Ohio, a Methodist minister named James B. Finley met with members of the Wyandot nation and asked them about their God and his. The Wyandots were descendants of Wendat refugees who, more than a century before, had fled from a land that kept changing names, and had just seven years earlier been … Continue reading Amerindian Gods